American Red Cross Assists In Syria…

Posted on August 30th, 2013 by Niki Clark on our national blog….

 

From Syria… in video…

Since March 2011, the world has watched as the crisis in Syria continues to escalate. As the U.S. contemplates military action, interest in the conflict—and the violence surrounding it—is increasing in the U.S. The one constant in the past 2.5 years of conflict has been the presence of the Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC).

With support from the global Red Cross network, SARC has been assisting those in need since the crisis began. In many parts of the country, it is the only humanitarian organization on the ground. Each month, its nearly 3,000 volunteers reach an average of 400,000 families with relief supplies and critical health services including emotional and psychological support despite increasingly dangerous working conditions. For 22 volunteers, this work has tragically resulted in their death. The most recent were killed in Homs earlier this week.

Because of the ongoing crisis:

  • Millions of people have been displaced and hundreds of thousands have been wounded or killed.
  • The number of people affected has more than doubled from 3 million to 6.8 million people since the beginning of 2013.
  • More than 4.25 million people have been displaced within Syria, many moving multiple times over the past two years to avoid the fighting.
  • There are more than 1.6 million Syrian refugees in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and countries in North Africa according to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR). It is anticipated that this number will grow to 3.5 million by the end of 2013.

The greatest needs of the affected population in Syria and the surrounding countries are basic healthcare, shelter, water and sanitation, food and relief supplies. The American Red Cross is helping the Syrian Arab Red Crescent address these needs through contributions totalling $1,035,000 to date. The most recent contribution of $400,000 helped the Syrian Arab Red Crescent provide food, relief supplies and basic healthcare to the affected population. Previous contributions supported refugee operations in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq and Turkey.

How You Can Help:

You can help the victims of countless crises around the world each year by making a financial gift to American Red Cross International Response, which will provide immediate relief and long-term support through supplies, technical assistance and other support to help those in need. Donations can be sent to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, D.C.20013, made by phone at 1-800-REDCROSS or 1-800-257-7575 (Spanish) or online via a secure connection at redcross.org.

To make a donation specific to our efforts in Syria, please send a check to the address above with “Syria” designated in memo line.

To learn more about the work of the American Red Cross in the U.S. and around the world, please visit redcross.org.

– See more at: http://redcrosschat.org/2013/08/30/updates-on-crisis-in-syria/#sthash.uYF4bGbF.dpuf

From our national blog and Nicki Clark…

From Syria…

Since March 2011, the world has watched as the crisis in Syria continues to escalate. As the U.S. contemplates military action, interest in the conflict—and the violence surrounding it—is increasing in the U.S. The one constant in the past 2.5 years of conflict has been the presence of the Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC).

With support from the global Red Cross network, SARC has been assisting those in need since the crisis began. In many parts of the country, it is the only humanitarian organization on the ground. Each month, its nearly 3,000 volunteers reach an average of 400,000 families with relief supplies and critical health services including emotional and psychological support despite increasingly dangerous working conditions. For 22 volunteers, this work has tragically resulted in their death. The most recent were killed in Homs earlier this week.

Because of the ongoing crisis:

  • Millions of people have been displaced and hundreds of thousands have been wounded or killed.
  • The number of people affected has more than doubled from 3 million to 6.8 million people since the beginning of 2013.
  • More than 4.25 million people have been displaced within Syria, many moving multiple times over the past two years to avoid the fighting.
  • There are more than 1.6 million Syrian refugees in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and countries in North Africa according to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR). It is anticipated that this number will grow to 3.5 million by the end of 2013.

The greatest needs of the affected population in Syria and the surrounding countries are basic healthcare, shelter, water and sanitation, food and relief supplies. The American Red Cross is helping the Syrian Arab Red Crescent address these needs through contributions totalling $1,035,000 to date. The most recent contribution of $400,000 helped the Syrian Arab Red Crescent provide food, relief supplies and basic healthcare to the affected population. Previous contributions supported refugee operations in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq and Turkey.

How You Can Help:

You can help the victims of countless crises around the world each year by making a financial gift to American Red Cross International Response, which will provide immediate relief and long-term support through supplies, technical assistance and other support to help those in need. Donations can be sent to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, D.C.20013, made by phone at 1-800-REDCROSS or 1-800-257-7575 (Spanish) or online via a secure connection at redcross.org.

To make a donation specific to our efforts in Syria, please send a check to the address above with “Syria” designated in memo line.

To learn more about the work of the American Red Cross in the U.S. and around the world, please visit redcross.org.

– See more at: http://redcrosschat.org/2013/08/30/updates-on-crisis-in-syria/#sthash.uYF4bGbF.dpuf

 

 

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About American Red Cross of Nevada

Blogs highlighting the work of volunteers and partners in the State of Nevada.
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